From the idea to the final result: the process of pupils' musical creation

Rūta Girdzijauskienė

Resumo


Composition is one of the musical activities most widely investigated in scholarly literature and its analysis is based on the studies of the creative process. There is little awareness about the music composition process and the creative experience of single pupils, since the creations of children are different to the creations of adults. In the article the results of the research that sets out to reveal the peculiarities of the creative process of pupils’ compositions are presented. Twenty inventories of the creative process of upper grade pupils’ compositions and fifteen inventories of lower grade pupils were analysed. The study results revealed that creation of pupils’ compositions can be defined as the process consisting of four stages: generation of an idea, research, testing and improvement of the first variant of the composition, presentation of the results of creation. Not all stages of the composition are equally important for lower and upper grade pupils. Different musical and life experiences influence both pupils’ creative processes and the quality of composition. 


Palavras-chave


composing, composition, creative process, upper and lower grade students.

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